Angela Murphy, PhD

Angela Murphy, PhD:
Assistant Professor
Postdoctoral Training:
University of South Carolina, 2004-2006
Education and Training:
B.S. Coastal Carolina University, 1997
Ph.D. University of South Carolina, 2004

Contact Information:
Phone: 803 216-3414
Fax:      803 216-3413
E-mail:
angela.murphy@uscmed.sc.edu

Research Focus

My research interests involve investigation of dietary and physical activity interventions to reduce macrophage-induced inflammation in cancer.  Current projects include:
Curcumin and Quercetin in Colon Cancer: Role of Macrophage-Induced Inflammation.  There is increasing recognition of diet-induced modulation of inflammatory responses as being central to the processes of human carcinogenesis.  The consumption of the anti-inflammatory dietary constituents curcumin, which is a component of the Indian spice currie, and quercetin, a flavonoid present in various fruits and vegetables, have been associated with reduced colon cancer risk.  While a number of studies have examined the effects of dietary supplements on inflammation in cancer, none have specifically examined the role of macrophages, primary mediators of inflammation, on these effects.  The overarching goal of this project is to 1) determine the independent and combined effects of the anti-inflammatory dietary constituents curcumin and quercetin on colon cancer progression, and 2) to determine whether these benefits result from a reduction in macrophage-induced inflammation. Supported by NIH.
Exercise and Quercetin in Colon Cancer: Role of Macrophages.  Both physical activity and consumption of dietary constituents, including quercetin, have been associated with reduced colon cancer risk in numerous epidemiological, pre-clinical and clinical studies. However, the precise interaction between physical activity and nutrition is seldom addressed.  Further, few studies have specifically examined the biological mechanisms for such a relationship.  Evidence supports a role of reduced inflammation in the benefits of physical activity and quercetin in colon cancer.  However, no studies have specifically examined the role of macrophages, primary mediators of inflammation, on these effects. The objectives of this project are to 1) determine the independent and combined effects of PA and the anti-inflammatory dietary constituent quercetin on colon cancer progression, and 2) determine whether these benefits result from a reduction in macrophage-induced inflammation.   Supported by the American Institute of Cancer Research.
Effects of High Fat Diet on Breast Cancer Progression.  Obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer; post-menopausal obese women have a greater risk of developing breast cancer and all women with breast cancer experience a higher mortality of dying from the disease than healthy women.  While the link between obesity and breast cancer has been established the pathophysiological mechanisms have not been well characterized.   It has been proposed that inflammation may play a role; adipose tissue secretes a number of growth factors and cytokines that play a role in chronic inflammation and metabolic derangements leading to promotion of BrCA.   The overall goal of this project is to examine the effects of high fat diet feeding (obesity) on tumor progression in the C3(1)SV40Tag mouse model of breast cancer and to determine if these effects are mediated by macrophage-induced inflammation. 

Recent Publications

Murphy EA, Davis JM, McClellan JL, Carmichael MD.  Quercetin’s effects on intestinal polyp multiplicity and macrophage number in the ApcMin+ mouse.  Nutrition and Cancer (In Press).
Murphy EA, Davis JM, McClellan JL, Gordon BT, Carmichael MD.  Curcumin’s effect on intestinal tumorigenesis and inflammation in the ApcMin+ mouse.  Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research.  (In Press). 
Murphy EA, Davis JM, Carmichael MD.  Immune modulating effects of β-glucan.   Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care. (In Press).
Carmichael MD, Davis JM, Murphy EA, Carson JA, Van Rooijen N, Mayer E, and Ghaffar A.  Role of brain macrophages on IL-1β and fatigue following eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. Brain, Behavior and Immunity 2010; 24(4):564-8.   
Davis JM, Carlstedt CJ, Chen S, Carmichael MD, Murphy EA.  The dietary flavonoid quercetin increases VO2max and endurance capacity.  International Journal of Sports Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism 2010; 20(1): 56-62. 
Murphy EA, Davis JM, Carmichael MD, Mayer EP, Ghaffar A. Benefits of oat β-glucan and sucrose feedings on infection and macrophage anti-viral resistance following exercise stress. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2009; 297(4):R1188-94.   
Davis JM, Murphy EA, Carmichael MD.  Effects of the Dietary Flavonoid Quercetin on Performance and Health.  Curr Sports Med Rep 2009; 8(4):206-13. 

Dumke CL, Davis JM, Murphy EA, Nieman DC, Carmichael MD, Quindry JC, Triplett NT, Utter AC, Gross SJ, Henson DA, McAnulty AR, McAnulty LS.  Three days of cycling stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis mRNA expression.  Eur J Appl Physiol 2009; 107(4):419-27.  

Davis JM, Murphy EA, Carmichael MD, Davis JB.  Quercetin increases brain and muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and exercise tolerance.  Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2009, Apr;296(4):R1071-7.  
Murphy EA, Davis JM, Carmichael MD, Gangemi JD, Ghaffar A, Mayer EP.  Exercise stress increases susceptibility to influenza infection.  Brain, Behavior and Immunity 2008; Nov 22(8): 1152-1155. 
Davis JM, Murphy EA, McClellan JL, Carmichael MD, Gangemi JD.  Quercetin reduces susceptibility to influenza infection following stressful exercise.  Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2008; Aug 295(2): R505-9.
Murphy EA, Davis JM, Brown AS, Carmichael MD, Ghaffar A, Mayer EP.  Effect of IL-6 deficiency on susceptibility to HSV-1 respiratory infection and intrinsic macrophage anti-viral resistance.  J Interferon Cytokine Res 2008; Oct 28(10): 589-95.
Nieman DC, Henson DA, McMahon M, Wrieden JL, Davis JM, Murphy EA, Gross SJ McAnulty LS, Dumke CL.  Effects of β-glucan on immune function and upper respiratory tract infections in endurance athletes. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2008; Aug 40(8): 1463-7. 
Henson DA, Nieman DC, Davis JM, Dumke CL, Gross S, Murphy EA, Carmichael MD, Jenkins D, Quindry J, McAnulty SR, McAnulty L, Utter A, Mayer EP.  Quercetin, immunity and illness after a 160km race.  Int J Sports Med. 2008; Oct 29(10): 856-63. 
Murphy EA, Davis JM, Brown AS, Carmichael MD, Carson JA, VanRooijen N, Ghaffar A, Mayer EP.   Benefits of oat β-glucan on respiratory infection following exercise stress: role of lung macrophages.  Am J  Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2008; May;294(5):R1593-9.